The Faslodex Scavenger Hunt

There has been a rest from writing, mainly because there has been a reprieve in HP’s health issues. Howard started on the NED-170 therapy about one month ago. It consists of three prescription drugs, one being a low dose chemo pill, plus four supplements. Thankfully, he has been on one of the prescription drugs for years, and 3 of the supplements since he returned home in August. He has felt great. He has said he feels normal. Wow!

It is mainstream knowledge that estrogen feeds breast cancers. What is not widely known at this point is that it probably feeds at least two other types of cancer, lung and prostate. Our NED contact was fairly certain that HP’s estrogen hormone was high and feeding his lung cancer. Based on her suspicion, we tested his estrogen levels. Confirmed. High. Our naturopath has started him on a supplement to manage high estrogen levels, called Indolplex. Indolplex offers zero toxicity. It may be more cost effective to eat lots of broccoli and Brussel sprouts, but one can’t realistically eat all day long, so popping the supplement has been easier.

But, it isn’t that easy. Another NED-170 patient has been receiving a combination of Zometa (bone strengthening) and Faslodex (estrogen management) infusions for her end stage breast cancer (metastases in her spine, ribs, shoulders). Her cancer was so advanced, the same cancer center that we go to in Colorado Springs didn’t offer traditional treatments and gave her months to live. She was diagnosed in July 2017, the same month Howard was diagnosed. By October, her PET scan showed No Evidence of Disease (NED). She continues to enjoy a high quality of life. Her story gives us a great deal of optimism.

But, as I said earlier, it isn’t that easy. Our unplanned journey has been easy at times, but as we get farther down the road, a different road, it becomes more challenging. Our NED contact, wants Howard to have the identical regimen as her breast cancer patient. We thought, piece of cake. Rocky Mountain Cancer Center was our common denominator. So we called our oncologist doctor to tell her the story of NED, the breast cancer patient, and the hopeful results. Our doctor walked across the hall and talked to her doctor. By the time they called and talked to us, the discussion was fairly demeaning. Such as, “you do realize there is a difference between breast cancer and lung cancer, right? You do know that estrogen is a female hormone, right?”

Ummmmm, YES. I say, “You do realize we are in a clinical study, right? A study that helps further the advancement of treatments.” “You do realize, right, that the protocol you all are married to right now is a result of tests and trials so, if you refuse treatment because it isn’t the norm, how do we continue to help the advancement?” Silence. Breaking the silence, she said, well, you can pay for it yourselves. Or, go to another country to get it. Or, relocate, because it is a once a month infusion for who knows how long.

As we collect more clues for how to get our hands on Faslodex, we feel relieved knowing we are using a natural and zero toxicity supplement to manage his estrogen. We will retest his estrogen levels soon to measure the success of Indolplex. Faslodex is not a zero toxicity drug, and has plenty of side effects, some that could be very problematic for Howard, but we want to hear the words, no evidence of disease.

Maybe, someday, mainstream medicine will embrace the possibility and knowledge that estrogen also feeds other types of cancers, too. We now know that our oncologist and RMCC may not be able to go outside of the box to help, because the pricing model for drugs is prohibitive, and insurance companies are the judge and jury.

We are currently mining the answers on how to be successful outside of the box, a box that offers no solution for longevity or quality of life. The scavenger hunt is on. Of course, we want to replicate the results of the other cancer patient. Who doesn’t want to hear, “your most recent PET scan shows no evidence of disease (NED)”?

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